VERStype

A Jigsaw Cut-up is composed of verses or passages and/or single words taken from two individual poetry pieces and disposed in a new form or order. A Jigsaw Cut-up may be a Cento and a Cut-up but it is not “an aleatory literary technique” since “aleatory” is defined “Depending on the throw of a die; random, arising by chance“; or, as was written once, “Un Coup de Dés Jamais N’Abolira Le Hasard.”

[Guidelines]

June-17

A Charm

Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)

Take of English earth as much
As either hand may rightly clutch.
In the taking of it breathe
Prayer for all who lie beneath—
Not the great nor well bespoke,
But the mere uncounted folk
Of whose life and death is none
Report or lamentation.
Lay that earth upon thy heart,
And thy sickness shall depart!

It shall sweeten and make whole
Fevered breath and festered soul;
It shall mightily restrain
Over-busy hand and brain;
It shall ease thy mortal strife
’Gainst the immortal woe of life,
Till thyself restored shall prove
By what grace the Heavens do move.

Take of English flowers these—
Spring’s full-facéd primroses,
Summer’s wild wide-hearted rose,
Autumn’s wall-flower of the close,
And, thy darkness to illume,
Winter’s bee-thronged ivy-bloom.
Seek and serve them where they bide
From Candlemas to Christmas-tide.
For these simples used aright
Shall restore a failing sight.

These shall cleanse and purify
Webbed and inward-turning eye;
These shall show thee treasure hid,
Thy familiar fields amid,
At thy threshold, on thy hearth,
Or about thy daily path;
And reveal (which is thy need)
Every man a King indeed!

Angel or Demon

Victor Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885)

(“Tu domines notre âge; ange ou démon, qu’importe!”)

Angel or demon! thou,—whether of light
The minister, or darkness—still dost sway
This age of ours; thine eagle’s soaring flight
Bears us, all breathless, after it away.
The eye that from thy presence fain would stray,
Shuns thee in vain; thy mighty shadow thrown
Rests on all pictures of the living day,
And on the threshold of our time alone,
Dazzling, yet sombre, stands thy form, Napoleon!

Thus, when the admiring stranger’s steps explore
The subject-lands that ‘neath Vesuvius be,
Whether he wind along the enchanting shore
To Portici from fair Parthenope,
Or, lingering long in dreamy reverie,
O’er loveliest Ischia’s od’rous isle he stray,
Wooed by whose breath the soft and am’rous sea
Seems like some languishing sultana’s lay,
A voice for very sweets that scarce can win its way.

Him, whether Paestum’s solemn fane detain,
Shrouding his soul with meditation’s power;
Or at Pozzuoli, to the sprightly strain
Of tarantella danced ‘neath Tuscan tower,
Listening, he while away the evening hour;
Or wake the echoes, mournful, lone and deep,
Of that sad city, in its dreaming bower
By the volcano seized, where mansions keep
The likeness which they wore at that last fatal sleep;

Or be his bark at Posillippo laid,
While as the swarthy boatman at his side
Chants Tasso’s lays to Virgil’s pleased shade,
Ever he sees, throughout that circuit wide,
From shaded nook or sunny lawn espied,
From rocky headland viewed, or flow’ry shore,
From sea, and spreading mead alike descried,
The Giant Mount, tow’ring all objects o’er,
And black’ning with its breath th’ horizon evermore!

May-17

A Shropshire Lad
A. E. Housman (26 March 1859 – 30 April 1936)

IV
REVEILLE

Wake: the silver dusk returning
Up the beach of darkness brims,
And the ship of sunrise burning
Strands upon the eastern rims.

Wake: the vaulted shadow shatters,
Trampled to the floor it spanned,
And the tent of night in tatters
Straws the sky-pavilioned land.

Up, lad, up, ’tis late for lying:
Hear the drums of morning play;
Hark, the empty highways crying
“Who’ll beyond the hills away?”

Towns and countries woo together,
Forelands beacon, belfries call;
Never lad that trod on leather
Lived to feast his heart with all.

Up, lad: thews that lie and cumber
Sunlit pallets never thrive;
Morns abed and daylight slumber
Were not meant for man alive.

Clay lies still, but blood’s a rover;
Breath’s a ware that will not keep
Up, lad: when the journey’s over
There’ll be time enough to sleep

Language of Flowers
Kate Greenaway (17 March 1846 – 6 November 1901)

Hand Flower Tree Warning.
Harebell Submission. Grief.
Hawkweed Quicksightedness.
Hawthorn Hope.
Hazel Reconciliation.
Heath Solitude.
Helenium Tears.
Heliotrope Devotion. Faithfulness.
HelleboreScandal. Calumny.
Helmet Flower (Monkshood) Knight-errantry.
Hemlock You will be my death.
Hemp Fate.
Henbane Imperfection.
Hepatica Confidence.
Hibiscus Delicate beauty.
Holly Foresight.
Holly Herb Enchantment.
Hollyhock Ambition. Fecundity.
Honesty Honesty. Fascination.
Honey Flower Love sweet and secret.
Honeysuckle Generous and devoted affection.
Honeysuckle Coral The colour of my fate.
Honeysuckle (French) Rustic beauty.
Hop Injustice.
Hornbeam Ornament.
Horse Chesnut Luxury.
Hortensia You are cold.
Houseleek Vivacity. Domestic industry.
Houstonia Content.
Hoya Sculpture.
Humble Plant Despondency.
Hundred-leaved Rose Dignity of mind.
Hyacinth Sport. Game. Play.
Hyacinth, White Unobtrusive loveliness.
Hydrangea A boaster. Heartlessness.
Hyssop Cleanliness.